4 dollar stella

4 dollar stella

Stack’s bowers introduces the 1879 stella pattern $4 gold

Americans were consumed by western conquest in the first half of the nineteenth century, fulfilling their “Manifest Destiny” to conquer the continent. By the 1870s, the country’s interior had been secured, and the country’s attention had shifted away from its borders, with a greater emphasis on foreign trade. However, a plethora of competing coins and currencies hindered global trading, and many people on both sides of the Atlantic called for a global coinage scheme to promote trade. A growing debate culminated in an international conference in Paris in 1867, at which twenty nations agreed to adopt a gold standard based on the French franc.
Americans were consumed by western conquest in the first half of the nineteenth century, fulfilling their “Manifest Destiny” to conquer the continent. By the 1870s, the country’s interior had been secured, and the country’s attention had shifted away from its borders, with a greater emphasis on foreign trade. However, a plethora of competing coins and currencies hindered global trading, and many people on both sides of the Atlantic called for a global coinage scheme to promote trade. A growing debate culminated in an international conference in Paris in 1867, at which twenty nations agreed to adopt a gold standard based on the French franc.

1879 coiled hair gold stella coin breaks $1 million at

It was planned to be a universal coin that could be traded for any currency in the world. Liberty with flowing hair, designed by Charles E. Barber, and Liberty with coiled hair, designed by George T. Morgan, were the two variants of the Stella. [1] The flowing hair form is the most common. Despite the fact that the coin, like the Gobrecht dollar, was produced as a pattern coin,[2] many catalogs list it as a regular-issue item.
The Stella was a pattern coin produced in 1879 and 1880 at the request of John A. Kasson, former chairman of the United States House Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures.
[3] The Stella was designed to contain a similar amount of precious metal as the regular LMU gold coin, the twenty-franc Napoleon, which was minted in France, Switzerland, and other LMU countries. The Stella, on the other hand, did not exactly meet the LMU norm in terms of composition and weight: the overall weight was 7 grams (rather than 6.45 grams), the gold content was 6 grams of fine gold (rather than 5.81 grams), and the coins were only.857 fine (rather than .900).

Coinweek: uncool coins! #3 – a $4 stella gold coin of ill

The 1879 and 1880 $4 gold coins, also known as “Stellas,” inspire awe and curiosity like few other US coins. The majority of collectors are unable to afford these mysterious coins. Despite this, the Stella has become one of the most famous US coins ever made. Also circulated examples now command a nearly six-figure price, thanks to wealthy collectors who have generated a market that far outstrips supply.
In numismatics, the five-pointed star and the word STELLA have become iconic symbols. The $4 Stellas of 1879 and 1880, on the other hand, were designed as pattern coins and were never intended for circulation. The Stella is one of only a few pattern coins that collectors of standard issue US coinage seek out, along with the 1856 Flying Eagle Cent and the 1836 Gobrecht Seated Dollar. Both of these are mentioned in A Guide Book of United States Coins alongside standard coinage due to their popularity (The Redbook).
The $4 Stella’s origins can be traced back to the 1870s, when many countries called for the creation of a standardized coin that would be compatible with a variety of international currencies. Early in the decade, a few attempts were made, resulting in coins such as the 1874 Bickford pattern $10 gold pieces, but the most significant attempts were made in 1879.

$4 gold stella video – numismatic video series

In an attempt to join the Latin Monetary Union, the United States Mint produced the $4 Stella coin in 1879 and 1880. (LMU). Comparable coins from France, Switzerland, and other European countries could be freely traded under this system because their metallic compositions were the same or similar. Since the value of the coins was still tied to the value of precious metals, trading foreign currency was much simpler than it is now, when exchange rates are dictated by global economic fluctuations.
Since Congress declined to join the LMU, only the pattern coins were ever made; the Stella never entered circulation. As a result, only a limited number of these coins were made, making them extremely rare and allowing them to sell for up to half a million dollars on the coin market.
The Stella is available in two distinct patterns: flowing hair and coiled hair. Lady Liberty’s long hair cascades loosely on the flowing hair coin, which is slightly more popular. She is a little more poised in the coiled hair version, with her hair piled in an intricate updo on top of her head. To check the coin’s worth, notations around the edges demarcate the coin’s weight and composition. Both coins have the same reverse side, which has a five-pointed star in the middle.

Posted in 4