Asian fitness women

Asian fitness women

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You should skip the navigation! World News article Why Are Chinese Women So Obsessed With This Workout Trend? Wong, Venus After a long day at work, Shanghai’s twentysomethings enjoy a meal out with friends, a walk along the popular Bund waterfront park, or even a late-night karaoke session.
The 25-year-old shipping service executive says she skips out on social outings twice a week so she can work out at a gym near her office. She sweats it out for almost two hours with a variety of aerobic exercises, documenting her efforts with a gym selfie shared on social media. Sun wrote in an emoji-filled caption below a series of images shared on WeChat, “Feeling energized and enjoying my natural glow from exercising.” “Here’s to my long road to losing weight!”
Such declarations are becoming more popular in China, where the fitness industry was projected to produce $5.1 billion last year, according to an IBISWorld research study. Since 2010, the industry has expanded at a steady rate of about 13% per year. Chinese women are seen as a prime target market for gyms and athletic-apparel companies aiming to bulk up their own bottom lines, according to the Wall Street Journal and the South China Morning Post.

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People of South Asian (SA) ancestry have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than people of other ethnicities. This increased risk is explained in part by this population’s unusual obesity phenotype of elevated visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Aerobic exercise reduces VAT in Europeans, although it has not been studied in South Africa, which has some of the lowest levels of physical activity in the world. As a result, the aim of this study was to see if exercise would help reduce VAT in the SA population, given the particular obesity phenotype and disease risk.
A total of 75 physically inactive postmenopausal South Asian women were randomly assigned to one of three 12-week programs: culturally focused (Bhangra dance), regular (gym-based), or control (nonexercise). The primary result was a reduction in VAT.
The culturally oriented and regular programs had average attendance of 78 percent 33 percent and 67 percent 25 percent, respectively. After adjusting for baseline physical activity and age, VAT was not significantly reduced in culturally dependent (-60 cm, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = -172 to 54, P = 0.300) or normal (-98 cm, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = -216 to 21, P = 0.106) exercise relative to regulation. VAT was substantially lower in those who attended more than two-thirds of the exercise classes compared to the control group (-109 cm, 95 percent CI = -204 to -13, P = 0.026).

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On the street, you pass by two women. Although they are both small, one is Caucasian and the other Asian. One of them is anorexic, while the other is naturally slim, you’re told. Which of you suffers from an eating disorder?
You’re probably thinking of a Caucasian woman. Eating disorders have traditionally been associated with white women, according to the National Association of Eating Disorders. However, new research on the steady rise of eating disorders in Asia is casting doubt on long-held beliefs on how cultural factors cause eating disorders in Asian and Asian-American people.
In the late 19th century, the United States and Western Europe were the first to report anorexia as a medical syndrome, and it became common in the West in the late 1960s, along with bulimia. Eating disorders first appeared in Asia in the 1970s, and Japan was the only Asian country to record their occurrence before 1990. Eating disorders are mental illnesses, as shown by the addition of binge eating disorder to the DSM-5 in 2013, which contained only anorexia and bulimia in previous editions.

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What else has been on our minds now that summer has arrived, besides cold boba drinks, summer travel plans, the beach, heat, and fun?? Getting the beach body in shape for all of the above activities! Fitness is a lifelong journey that can start at any point in our lives. For some of us, the exercise “Day 1’s” tend to come about every week or so. But, for the most part, we strive to maintain a level of consistency. Physical fitness refers to a state of health and well-being, and more precisely, the ability to carry out everyday tasks without becoming exhausted. Many of our listeners have inquired about our fitness activities and everyday workouts, so this is for you!

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