Fear of coins

Fear of coins

Viacom’s fear of coins

Chrometophobia is a severe aversion to income. It’s also known as chrematophobia, and it includes everything from a fear of spending money to a fear of thinking about money to a fear of touching money.
We’ve all experienced financial stress at some stage in our lives. A quarter of Americans claim they are constantly or frequently concerned about money. Given that four out of every five Americans are in debt, and about 15% of households have a negative net worth, this makes sense. Money and debt, let’s face it, can be frightening.
Chrometophobia, on the other hand, brings the usual fear of money and spending to a whole new level. To learn more about this phenomenon, check out our infographic below, or keep reading to learn more about what money anxiety is, what triggers it, and how to resolve it.
Chrometophobia is less common than claustrophobia (the fear of crowded places) or acrophobia (the fear of heights) (the fear of heights). Chrometophobia, like other phobias, is an unnatural and irrational fear that manifests itself in a variety of symptoms that differ in severity. Chrometophobia manifests itself in a number of ways.

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“No, that isn’t it,” Charlie Brown says.

Viacom’s fear of coins (the sequel)

Lucy continues to list a variety of phobias, including cats and stairs, none of which seem to be a problem for Charlie Brown. She didn’t, however, come up with the one that afflicts NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Jr.: kosmemophobia, or the fear of jewelry.
Yes, it’s true. Kosmemophobia is a psychiatric disorder that Earnhardt has been diagnosed with, as revealed in this ESPN interview. He overcome his aversion long enough to purchase a large-looking diamond for his fiancée, Amy Reimann, and she will wear a wedding ring until they are married. She doesn’t wear any other jewelry, though, because of his illness.
The term derives from the Greek word “kosmem-,” which means “adornment.” Jewelry is referred to as kosmimata in Greek. The word “cosmetic” comes from the same source, but the fear of cosmetics is known as “maquillaphobia,” after the French word “maquiller,” which means “to apply makeup.” Metallophobia, or the fear of metals or metallic objects, and cuprolaminophobia, or the fear of coins, are kosmemophobia’s corollaries. People who are afraid of one may also be afraid of the other or both.

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The fear of buttons is known as kumpounophobia, and it is a relatively uncommon disorder. The basic fear, like any other phobia, can differ significantly between sufferers. Some people are afraid of those buttons because of their texture. Others believe the buttons are filthy. Some people are only afraid of touching or wearing buttons, while others are afraid of seeing strangers or friends wearing buttons.
Buttons can cause people to feel disgusted rather than be afraid of them. Fear and disgust, according to researchers, are inextricably related. If the texture of some buttons disgusts you, you will begin to avoid handling them. This dread could spread over time to include all keys, including those with a different texture. Even if you are not expected to touch buttons, you can develop a fear of seeing them.

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According to a team led by Tomasz Zaleskiewicz of the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw, people who counted money had a lower fear of death than people who counted white paper slips — around 5.3 versus 6.5 on a zero-to-12 scale. Furthermore, people’s perceptions of […]
According to a team led by Tomasz Zaleskiewicz of the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw, people who counted money had a lower fear of death than people who counted white paper slips — around 5.3 versus 6.5 on a zero-to-12 scale. Furthermore, when people were primed to think about death, their estimates of the sizes of coins were on average 34% greater, probably because thoughts of death intensify the subjective value attributed to money. According to the researchers, people seem to want money in part because it has the ability to alleviate fears of death.

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