Hackers of the world unite

Hackers of the world unite

Hackers of the world unite

Danger Incorporated, an Atlanta-based genre-blending duo, released their major label debut album, Hackers of The World Unite, today through Awful Records/RCA Records. Hackers, one of the duo’s favorite films from 1995, influenced the new record. Listen to the album by clicking here.
Louie Duffelbags and Boothlord, who have been experimenting with genres since high school, are known for morphing and manipulating popular sounds to create something that is uniquely and purely Danger Incorporated. Their latest album is proof of this, demonstrating their unique versatility as they continue to push the limits of music.

Danger incorporated – turn it up (audio)

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“You don’t get it,” I explained. “It’s a compliment to be called a hacker!” It indicates that they were capable programmers.” The critics frowned. They didn’t believe it. Even my editor couldn’t save me in the end; I had no choice but to swallow my aesthetic pride and convert “hackers” to “creators.” Argh!
I sought solace from MIT Linguist/Professor of Humor Samuel Jay Keyser, who was depressed and dejected. This form of linguistic assimilation, Jay assured me, is very normal, and that resistance is futile. Is it a waste of time? We must, however, resist! Hacker is far too talented to be defeated! I propose that we start a major lexicographic edification campaign right now, on this page!

Hackers of the world unite

Those who are labeled as hackers, despite their flaws, have the same right to play as everyone else. They should be praised for their enthusiastic, if rustic, contribution to the game as long as they meet a level that prevents them from causing widespread harm to golf courses.
Peter Corrigan has championed their cause in the Independent on Sunday’s Hacker column for several years, and as a 28 handicapper who plays at least twice a week in the summer and winter both here and abroad, he has seen firsthand the demoralising disasters that can befall the less-gifted golfers.
His frank confessions of his flaws have convinced many a fellow hacker that they are not alone in their suffering. Some readers have written in to say they were about to abandon the game before they learned of Corrigan’s weekly woes.
Golf’s handicapping system is widely regarded as the best in the sport, allowing even the worst players to compete on an equal footing with the best. While it still favors the better players, the hacker has a fighting chance.

Danger incorporated ‘hackers of the world unite

For the R&A and the USGA, the angel was in charge of the information. During Rory McIlroy’s epic rant against the governing bodies, in which he accused them of “reeking of self value,” it was widely overlooked that he ultimately supported their possible solution to the game’s biggest issue.
McIlroy was asked if he would support different rules for the pros after arguing that the ‘Distance Insights Study’ only concentrated on 0.01 percent of golfers (i.e. the elite). He responded, “I’d be all for that.” “If they want to make the game more complicated for us in order to add more skill to the game, then sure.”
What’s more, guess what? The R&A and the USGA hope to do just that. Their idea is to implement ‘Local Rules,’ which would allow any tournament committee to impose equipment limitations, whether it be on the ball, clubs, or, most likely, both. In practice, this means that the 99.99 percent will be able to keep using the turbo-charged gear they already have, while McIlroy will see some brakes added.

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