Jain family institute

Jain family institute

Jfi social wealth seminar with rahul basu on the resource

THE JAIN FAMILY INSTITUTE IS AN APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES RESEARCH ORGANIZATION THAT WORKS TO TRANSFORM JUST AND EQUITABLE RESEARCH AND POLICY FROM THEORY TO IMPLEMENTATION IN SOCIETY BY DEVELOPING ACTIONABLE RESEARCH AND BUILDING PILOT PROGRAMS TO TEST AND SCALE THESE IDEAS TO ULTIMATELY ACH
EXPAND EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS TO ACCESS HIGH-QUALITY HIGHER EDUCATION AND CAREER TRAINING PROGRAMS THAT ALIGN WITH THEIR EDUCATIONAL GOALS, AND ENSURE THAT THE MOST NEEDY STUDENTS BENEFIT.
THE ACTIVITIES OF THE JAIN FAMILY INSTITUTE PROGRAM ARE CENTRED ON SUPPORT FOR YOUNG AND EMERGING VISUAL ARTISTS AND HUMANITIES RESEARCHERS. THE ORGANIZATION OFFERS CONSULTING SERVICES TO PUBLIC COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES With REGARD TO STUDENT DEBT PROBLEMS. IT IS A RESEARCH INCUBATOR THAT Turns PROMISING IDEAS INTO REAL-WORLD PILOTS AND PROVIDES STUDENTS WITH AN Creative Alternative TO THE RISKS AND Pressures OF STUDENT DEBT BY OPENING UP NEW OPPORTUNITIES.

Jfi – jain family institute

The Jain Family Institute is looking for an intern with a deep economics background to help with our current projects on mass digitization, universal basic income, post-work society, higher education funding, and meta-research. The perfect candidate is passionate about interdisciplinary cooperation. You’ll be joining a select group of generalists with expertise in economics, econometrics, data science theory, physics, art history, literature, and engineering.
Over the course of six months, the internship will pay $5,000 in stipends for about 15 hours a week. The intern will report directly to JFI’s CEO. Those interested should email [email protected] a CV or résumé with contact details, a letter of interest, and a writing sample of 10–15 pages1 demonstrating an ability to clearly synthesize, interpret, and convey information from a variety of sources.
Our research focuses on the social forces that influence how people live, function, and learn. Our team works with businesses, governments, and universities to test scalable, high-impact approaches.

How-to video: millennial student debt – comparison tool

According to time.com, Robert F. Smith, the billionaire who promised to pay off the student debt of the Morehouse College class of 2019 during a commencement speech last year, is introducing a new campaign to help alleviate the burden of student loans at all HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities).
The Student Freedom Initiative, a nonprofit organization, will begin in 2021 at up to 11 HBCUS campuses, providing a flexible, lower-risk alternative to high-interest private student loans for juniors and seniors majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).
The list of HBCUs that will be part of the initial launch is still being finalized. SFI will focus on the disproportionate loan burden faced by Black students, while also providing more options for students whose career or educational options may be limited by high student debt.
Fund II hopes to raise at least $500 million by October in order to make the program “self-sustaining” through contributions and income-based repayments from graduates. Michael Lomax, CEO of the United Negro College Fund; Henry Louis Gates Jr., director of Harvard’s Hutchins Center for African and African-American Research; the Jain Family Institute; and the Education Finance Institute will be among the partners in Fund II.

Social wealth seminar with steve randy waldman on social

More than a decade after the 2008 financial crisis, median household incomes have remained stagnant, and global economic growth is projected to slow further from its already historic low. Although the unemployment rate has decreased, part-time, service, and temporary workers continue to be the key drivers of labor market expansion. The “skills gap” has been widely blamed for the slow recovery from the crisis; analysts and politicians alike believe that good jobs exist, but that Americans are actually unqualified to fill them.
ALICIA SASSER MODESTINO, DANIEL SHOAG, and JOSHUA BALLANCE presented evidence against this view at the American Economic Association’s recent meeting. They show that employers raised skill requirements in states and professions with higher unemployment rates, using a proprietary database of more than 36 million online work postings. Their results indicate that the ubiquity of eligible candidates drove employers to increase hiring standards, rather than a lack of skills, which weakened labor markets. The authors were able to validate this process by testing employer responses to an influx of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.

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