Seeing the truth

Seeing the truth

Seeing the truth

Kaye Knowles meets Vedat Erdem, a Kurdish cotton farmer from Turkey’s south east, while on vacation in Marmaris. Their holiday romance quickly turns into a full-fledged love affair. Kaye struggles with the language barrier, cultural differences, and family objections as life takes her on an emotional rollercoaster of joy, heartbreak, optimism, and disappointment, blinded by love.
Kaye Knowles meets Vedat Erdem, a Kurdish cotton farmer from Turkey’s south east, while on vacation in Marmaris. Their holiday romance quickly turns into a full-fledged love affair. Kaye struggles with the language barrier, cultural differences, and family objections as life takes her on an emotional rollercoaster of joy, heartbreak, optimism, and disappointment, blinded by love. Although she enjoys the delights of Turkey, her world is turned upside down when she discovers that their relationship is based on lies and deception.

Make wise decisions by seeing the truth: workshop video

I made a video a while back in which I clarified the single most significant obstacle to knowledge. People don’t see things because seeing them causes them pain, as I mentioned. When the truth implies discomfort, not seeing it is a coping mechanism in the form of an avoidance technique. If you want to learn more about this subject, watch the video titled The Single Biggest Barrier To Awareness.
People sit across from me in every city I visit, feeling helpless and hopeless because they need someone in their life to see something (one of their essential truths), and no matter what they do, they can’t get them to see or consider it. This is a painful experience because when someone doesn’t see something, they don’t make the necessary adjustments. For eg, if we don’t notice that we’re walking on a cat’s tail, we’ll keep doing so and might even believe that our cat is insane when it screams.
What most people don’t realize is that they’re up against opposition. This is something we’ve always been taught. We confront opponents with equal or greater adversity. We bulldoze it or try to get around it, anything but directly resolving it. When we do this, we lose sight of the fact that combating resistance is the same as resisting resistance. That’s not going to work. Opposition is what all resistance is. However, it acts as a shield, preventing us from having a genuine relationship with whatever is behind the shield. I’m going to give you a piece of advice. Stop and deal with the opposition directly if someone is resisting anything. Deal explicitly with the part of them that refuses to consider anything if they fail to accept it. Avoid attempting to persuade them of the facts and instead discuss their aversion to seeing it.

Knowing and seeing the truth | ajahn karunadhammo

First experiences, however, may be deceiving. This image is a screen capture from a viral video that has been circulating on social media (check out the video below). Since I see many animals with restricting illnesses and disabilities in my work as an Animal Translator, I decided to post this wonderful video about dogs on my personal social media page.
There were a lot of responses. What surprised me, though, was how few people actually watched it. They didn’t bother to turn up the volume, and in a matter of seconds, they had developed an opinion about the video that had nothing to do with its true meaning. Many people expressed their displeasure with what they perceived as obnoxious humans spoiling their pets.
And this isn’t a video of spoiled dogs that have their humans wrapped around their little toes (or fingers, if we’re talking about dogs). In reality, this video was intended to raise awareness about a disorder known as Canine Megaesophagus, which is a rare condition that affects dogs. When these animals feed normally, food cannot enter the stomach due to a swollen esophagus.

Meat eater breaks down after seeing the truth

Daniel Coyle’s riveting new book The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups lays out a number of interesting scenarios. And, honestly, if you only have time to read one book before the leaves begin to fall, make it this one. Coyle lifts the veil and exposes the secrets that enable great groups to outperform the rest of us.
Consider the case of Dave Cooper. He’s a near-legendary member of the Navy’s SEAL Team Six, having risen through the ranks to become Team Six’s highest enlisted rank, command master chief, in charge of the entire group’s training. He’s the guy who taught the assassins how to kill Osama bin Laden.
Cooper’s four-person reconnaissance mission had been directed to travel from Bagram to Jalalabad and back in a single day on New Year’s Eve 2001. Insurgents patrolled the 110-mile route, which was pocked with explosives and often impassable. However, the commander demanded that they leave, and they did. They arrived in Jalalabad after dark, but the commander demanded that they turn around and return to Bagram right away so that the task could be completed on time.

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