Stupidity at its finest

Stupidity at its finest

Stupidity at its finest

I completely accept. I run TDs with camo and binoculars, and I sometimes “camp” and snipe on hills if I have spotters and no one appears to be in danger. I have Tiger I as well, and I never snipe from a hill. The TDs are there to help with that. If I expect contact soon, I’ll step forward to a good sidescrape position with a good field of fire and snipe from there. You can’t “camp” for too long there, waiting for enemies. A “shot clock” is required to determine when it is time to begin.
I’ve fought a lot, but I’ve never met an opponent who could give me “A Beautiful Death,” as we Spartans call it. With all of the world’s warriors assembled against us, I can only hope that one of them is up to the challenge.

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I’ll be honest, I’m not familiar with the idea of slang. It’s incomprehensible to me! Slang words, unlike other words in the English language, have no established roots. It’s as if people just throw a random word into a sentence and if it works, everyone else follows suit. Much of the time, I have to look up terms in the urban dictionary in order to keep up with those discussions I have with other people. The word “cheesed” inspired me to write a blog about this topic. Come on, people! What’s with the cheese? Cheese is a tasty treat! It’s such a good thing that we now use it to convey annoyance or indignation in sentences. Exasperate, frustrate, or bore is the exact definition: Ricky was very cheesed. It sounds ridiculous! But, to be frank, some slang words have crept into my vocabulary over time, mostly because the people I hang out with use it on a regular basis, and it inevitably catches on. It never lasts, and I mostly use it only for the sake of amusement when I use slang. Slang, in my opinion, makes people sound stupid and illiterate. I despise slang.

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My family used EarthLink with a dial-up connection in the late 1990s or early 2000s. We had a Compaq machine, I believe. I found the website funny as a newly born kid, and I shared it with my family and laughed about it with friends. I’m sure I’ve seen it hundreds of times.
I confess it because the website Hampster Dance is still fresh in my mind after fifteen years. I will perform the song for you. I’ve been thinking a lot about this experience in the light of bitcoin (and the blockchain) and the challenges of its proponents to express its meaning now that I’m older and burdened with the need for a certain serious disposition to the planet.
So, I’d like to use this opportunity to discuss Hampster Dance. I’d like us to discuss Hampster Dance in order to demonstrate the extreme force of incredibly stupid ideas. Hampster Dance is one of the best early examples of the Internet as communication in all its raw, rambling, and crazy ways.
Maybe I was aware that I was using the Internet and could tell the difference between a plastic and metal screen. I’m not certain. I had no idea I was following protocols. It didn’t matter to me whether the website’s content was provided by a GIF, a WAV file, or even a browser.

Stupidity at its finest meaning

The bias, according to social psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, arises from an internal misconception in people of low skill and an external misperception in people of high ability; that is, “the incompetent’s miscalibration stems from an error about the self, while the highly competent’s miscalibration stems from an error about others.”

Stupidity at its finest.

[1] It stems from people’s failure to understand their lack of competence and is linked to the cognitive bias of illusory superiority. People cannot objectively assess their level of competence without the self-awareness of metacognition.
In Kruger and Dunning’s 1999 research “Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One’s Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments,” the psychological phenomenon of illusory superiority was described as a type of cognitive bias.
[1] An example of cognitive bias can be found in the criminal case of McArthur Wheeler, who robbed two banks on April 19, 1995, though his face was soaked in lemon juice. He reasoned that it would make him invisible to the security cameras. This conviction was evidently founded on his misinterpretation of lemon juice’s chemical properties as an invisible ink. [eight]

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