What happened to doomsday castle

What happened to doomsday castle

Preppers called ‘crazy’ now expect to sell out their west

“Doomsday Castle,” a new unscripted National Geographic Channel series from the creators of the hit “Doomsday Preppers,” premieres Tuesday and aims to give the term “family bonding” a whole new meaning. Forget about board games and Sunday dinners. Brent Sr., Brent II, Ashley, Lindsay, Dawn Marie, and Michael, an American prepper, are banding together to create a self-sufficient medieval fortress to shield themselves from the turmoil that the apocalypse will bring. Despite the fact that many expected end-of-the-world dates have passed, Brent Sr. and his family are on a quest to convince the world that doomsday is coming — it’s only a matter of when.
They believe that an electromagnetic pulse, or EMP, would set off the apocalypse. He defines an EMP as causing a complete takedown of the power grid system, effectively leaving humanity in the dark… literally. The EMP will be triggered by one of two scenarios, according to the family of preppers: a nuclear bomb being exploded in the atmosphere or a high-intensity solar flare (similar to what happened in 1859). THE NEW YORK TIMES PHOTOS: CELEBRITIES

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Michael Mills, a British criminologist and writer, visited the United States in 2014 to find out why so many Americans were planning for the end of the world as we knew it.

National geographic – doomsday castle

People all over the world were stockpiling supplies such as, MREs (meal-ready-to-eat rations), and straws for turning pond water into drinkable liquid.

Doomsday castle profile: ashley | national geographic

The “preppers” kept their doomsday supplies for a number of purposes. Some people were concerned about food and water shortages after natural disasters, while others wanted to be prepared for war, deadly pandemic diseases, or a major power outage at any time. However, several people were inspired to prepare in part because of who was in charge of the White House at the time. Mills questioned Mary, a prepper, about her motivations:
Mills said at the time, “Let me ask you how politics affects your prepping.” “Will you be able to –” “Yes, Obama must resign!” Mary yelled as she dashed over to Mills’ tape recorder. “OBAMA HAS GOT TO GO!” After Trump’s election, there has been a decrease in preparedness. Mary’s point of view was not unique among American preppers at the time. Thirty-five of the 39 people Mills talked with on that 2014 trip identified as conservatives, using terms like “independent,” “right-wing Republican,” “libertarian,” and “conserv-atarian” to describe themselves. However, after President Trump took office in 2016, prepping has plummeted across the country. There are fewer prepper conferences around the country, and some prepper business owners (including Mills) told Business Insider that the prepping group isn’t as involved as it was three years ago. It’s an example of how Trump allays many of his supporters’ worst fears, including those of conservative preppers.

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Thousands of people have been thinking about “prepping” for an apocalyptic occurrence for years. For others, preparing for a natural disaster is as simple as stocking up on water, food, and fuel for several weeks. Others, on the other hand, take things a lot more seriously and are preparing for a cataclysmic occurrence that might change life as we know it.
Consider the following scenario: terrorists, either international or domestic (think Jericho), have detonated a nuclear device on US territory, sending the world into turmoil. The ensuing Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) blast destroys everything that does not have a shielded circuit board, including computers, cellphones, and most unmodified automobiles.
Do you believe EMPs aren’t a real threat? Solar flares are one of the many occurrences that can trigger EMPs. Solar flares, such as the one that narrowly missed the Planet a few weeks ago and the one that scientists expect would strike in September 2013, are a major source of concern. If an EMP hits, how can you feed, drink, and survive? If you’ve been preparing for such an occurrence for years, like Brent Sr., you’ll flee to the hills and take shelter in your fortified EMP-proof castle.

Inside a $900,000 ‘doomsday prepper’ castle

Doomsday Castle is a National Geographic Channel reality television series that follows Brenton Bruns and his ten children as they prepare for the end of the world in a castle he designed in South Carolina. Bruns claims that he constructed a castle to withstand an electromagnetic pulse because a castle can survive without electricity and protect itself against marauding marauders. It began as a bunker in 1999 and is still being expanded. Bruns claims that his land is riddled with booby traps, and that his neighbors are gun-toting preppers.
Doomsday Castle is a National Geographic Channel reality television series that follows Brenton Bruns and his ten children as they prepare for the end of the world in a castle he designed in South Carolina. Bruns claims that he constructed a castle to withstand an electromagnetic pulse because a castle can survive without electricity and protect itself against marauding marauders. It began as a bunker in 1999 and is still being expanded. Bruns claims that his land is riddled with booby traps, and that his neighbors are gun-toting preppers.

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